Understanding the New Changes to Food Labels and the Corresponding Effects on Food and Beverages

Event Information
Product Format
Prerecorded Event
Presenter(s)
Length
60 minutes
Product Description

Get the Lowdown on FDA’s Recent Final Labeling Changes on Food and Beverages

 

After more than two years, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently finalized the proposed labeling changes regarding the nutrition information displayed on food, beverages, and dietary supplements. These revisions constitute some significant changes to both the cosmetic look of the Nutrition Facts and Supplement Facts panels, as well as the information being provided to consumers. Among the changes are:

  • Doubling the size of the font size of calories, making them the largest piece of information on the panel;
  • Adding a line for “added sugars” with a DRV of 50g; and
  • Adding Vitamin D and potassium as nutrients required to be displayed, while moving vitamin C and A to voluntary status.

Additionally, the FDA announced changes to the Recommended Amounts Customarily Consumed (RACC) and the manner in which serving sizes and servings per container are determined.  Foods like ice cream, fish, and beverages other than milk and juice products, have updated serving sizes based on consumer consumption information.

The regulations addressing these revisions to labeling becomes effective on July 26, 2016 and companies may start revising labels at that time. All companies must be in compliance by July 26, 2018 or July 26, 2019, depending on total sales of the company. Accordingly, companies must be aware of these changes and how they will affect their products.

This session with expert speaker Justin J. Prochnow will help you understand the latest FDA revisions to the labeling requirements for food, beverages and dietary supplements and help you ensure compliance with the regulations.

Learning Highlights:

  • The prominence of calories and the addition of “added sugars” could have a big impact on the use of sugars and other sweetener ingredients used in products.
  • The serving size increase to 12 fl oz from 8 fl oz for most beverages. This will have an effect on the amount of nutrients, such as calories, sugar, and fat.
  • Containers with up to 200% of the RACC, must be labeled as single serving containers. This means beverage containers up to 24 fl oz are single serving containers.  Additionally, packages between 200% and 300% of the RACC must include dual column information of the amounts per serving and per container.

Who should attend?

  • Principals involved with food, beverages and supplement companies.
  • Regulatory and quality personnel in food, beverage, and supplement companies.
  • Attorneys representing companies in the food, beverage, and supplement companies.
  • Consumers that want to know more about labels.

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About Our Speaker

Justin J. Prochnow

Justin J. Prochnow focuses his practice on regulatory and business issues primarily in the food, beverage, dietary supplement, and cosmetic industries. Justin works with clients to ensure regulatory compliance with statutes and regulations enforced by the Food and Drug Administration, the Federal Trade Commission and other regulatory agencies, including the review of labeling, marketing and advertising materials. Justin assists clients with other regulatory issues like recalls, FDA inspections...   More Info
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